Proponents of recreational cannabis say a special session means it’s going to happen

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The number of producer plants and the eradication of previous cannabis crimes are just some of the things that will have to be ironed out when lawmakers meet again for a special session on cannabis. “New Mexico is at a moment when we need economic relief and we need the infrastructure for it,” said Shanon Jaramillo, founder of Seedcrest. Seedcrest tries to help people in the recreational cannabis industry when it becomes legal to do so. “Our program had a systemic problem for years because not enough cannabis was made available to the medical community,” said Barker. But Jaramillo said she had a feeling the legislature did and will do so before sending anything to the governor’s desk I think we had good support and so I look forward to the special session to make sure this play for the patients, ”said Jaramillo. Jaramillo also believes the bill must overturn all previous cannabis convictions. “So that we first honor them and say, ‘OK, we’re not going to criminalize you anymore. You can turn them into skills and work with them. “It’s huge,” said Jaramillo. Ben Lewinger of the New Mexico Chamber of Commerce for Cannabis said the number of growers needs to make sure there is enough supply, but too many and smaller companies can cite this as an example. “Lots of comparisons between what cannabis is supposed to look like and the beer industry in New Mexico. We have many small operators who offer a wide variety of products, ”said Lewinger. Weninger said economic impact studies show recreational cannabis could add 11,000 jobs and hundreds of millions of dollars to the state in its first five years. The special session on recreational cannabis is tentatively scheduled for March 31st. Watch the video below to learn more about recreational cannabis and the upcoming special session.

The number of producer plants and the elimination of past crimes against cannabis are just some of the things that have yet to be ironed out when lawmakers meet again for a special session on cannabis.

“New Mexico is at a moment when we need economic relief and we need the infrastructure for that,” said Shanon Jaramillo, founder of Seedcrest.

Seedcrest tries to help people in the recreational cannabis industry when it becomes legal here.

However, others like medical cannabis user Jason Barker believe that recreational cannabis could mean less available to people like him.

“Our program has had a systemic problem for years with not enough cannabis being made available to the medical community,” said Barker.

But Jaramillo said she feels lawmakers have addressed this and will do so before sending anything to the governor’s desk.

“I think we had good support so I’m looking forward to the special session to make sure they play for the patients,” said Jaramillo.

Jaramillo also believes the bill must overturn all previous cannabis convictions.

“So that we first honor them and say, ‘OK, we won’t criminalize you anymore. You can turn them into skills and work with them. It’s huge, ”said Jaramillo.

Ben Lewinger of the New Mexico Cannabis Chamber of Commerce said the number of producer plants must ensure there is enough supply, but too many and smaller companies cannot keep up.

He offered this as an example.

“Lots of comparisons between what cannabis is supposed to look like and the beer industry in New Mexico. We have many small operators who offer a wide variety of products, ”said Lewinger.

Lewinger said economic impact studies show recreational cannabis could add 11,000 jobs and hundreds of millions of dollars to the state in its first five years.
The special session on recreational cannabis is tentatively scheduled for March 31st.

Watch the video below to learn more about recreational cannabis and the upcoming special session.